April 24, 2014

FSA Begins Administering Livestock Disaster Assistance Programs

The 2014 Farm Bill, formally known as the Agricultural Act of 2014, makes the Livestock Forage Program, (LFP) and Livestock Indemnity Program, (LIP) permanent programs and provides retroactive authority to cover eligible losses back to October 1, 2011. Producers have until January 30, 2015 to file an application and bring in livestock death documentation from losses occurred from October 1, 2011 to January 1, 2015.  Death losses on or after January 1, 2015 must be reported to the office no later than 30 days after the loss is apparent.

Enrollment also begins on April 15 for producers with losses covered by the Emergency Assistance for Livestock, Honeybees, and Farm-Raised Fish Program (ELAP) and the Tree Assistance Program (TAP).

  • LFP provides compensation to eligible livestock producers that have suffered grazing losses due to drought or fire on publicly managed land. An eligible livestock producer must own, cash lease, or be a contract grower of eligible livestock during the 60 calendar days before the beginning date of the qualifying drought or fire in a county that is rated by the U.S. Drought Monitor as D2, D3, or D4.
  • LIP provides compensation to eligible livestock producers that have suffered livestock death losses in excess of normal mortality due to adverse weather. Eligible livestock includes beef cattle, dairy cattle, bison, poultry, sheep, swine, horses, and other livestock as determined by the Secretary.
  • ELAP provides emergency assistance to eligible producers of livestock, honeybees and farm-raised fish that have losses due to disease, adverse weather, or other conditions, such as blizzards and wildfires, as determined by the Secretary of Agriculture.
  • TAP provides financial assistance to qualifying orchardists and nursery tree growers to replant or rehabilitate eligible trees, bushes and vines damaged by natural disasters.

To expedite applications, all producers who experienced losses are encouraged to collect record documenting these losses in preparation for the enrollment in these disaster assistance programs. Information on the types of records necessary can be provided by local FSA county offices.

Livestock Forage Program (LFP)

The Livestock Forage Program (LFP) provides compensation to eligible livestock producers who suffer grazing losses on or after October 1, 2011 due to:

  • Drought (during grazing period)
  • Fire (federal land)

An eligible producer must have owned, shared or was a contract grower of the eligible livestock during the 60 days before the beginning date of the qualifying drought or fire in a county that is rated by the U.S. Drought Monitor as D2, D3, or D4. The producer must also provide grazing land that is physically located in the county affected by drought or on federal lands where the producer was prohibited from grazing due to a fire. You must have your grazing acres certified as one of the eligibility requirements.

Eligible livestock include:

  • Beef, Dairy, Buffalo, Poultry, Equine, Goats, Sheep, Swine, Elk, Reindeer, Deer, Alpacas, Emus, and Llamas

Livestock Indemnity Program (LIP)

(Livestock death program)

The Livestock Indemnity Program (LIP) is a program designed to help producers who suffered livestock losses on or after October 1, 2011.  Producers who have livestock losses over the normal mortality may qualify for a payment.  Producers have until January 30, 2015 to file an application and bring in livestock death documentation from losses occurred from October 1, 2011 to January 1, 2015.  Any death losses on or after January 1, 2015 must be reported to the office no later than 30 days after the loss is apparent.  Please document ALL deaths.

Only death losses due to adverse weather will be eligible for payment.  Other death losses will help meet the normal mortality loss.  When documenting losses, please bring in the following information:

1.     Beginning livestock inventories

2.     Livestock death numbers

3.     Please list category, date, and reason (lightning, old age, etc)

4.     Production/calving records, vet receipts, rendering truck receipts, etc

LIP losses and payments will be calculated every calendar year.  Livestock categories for Beef, Dairy and Buffalo include:

  • Adult livestock
  • less than 400 lbs
  • greater than 400 lbs

Eligible livestock include:

  • Beef, Dairy, Buffalo, Poultry, Equine, Goats, Sheep, Swine, Elk, Reindeer, Deer, Alpacas, Emus, and Llamas
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Growth Energy Responds To Corn Stover Ethanol Study

A study from the University of Nebraska was recently published in Nature Climate Change and suggests using corn residue to make ethanol and other biofuels reduces soil carbon and can generate more greenhouse gases than gasoline. 25x’25 says the study offers nothing beyond what biofuel interests already understand – that excessively removing agricultural residue from the soil has negative impacts on climate. Growth Energy CEO Tom Buis says the conclusions reached in the study are flawed.

For one thing – Buis says the study’s authors assume all 10 Corn Belt states would be harvesting 75-percent of corn stover – which is unrealistic and beyond what any cellulosic ethanol producers are actually considering. He says both USDA and EPA have refuted the study and called out the authors’ unrealistic assumptions – concluding the study doesn’t provide useful information relevant to the life cycle of greenhouse gas emissions from corn stover ethanol.  When it comes to reducing greenhouse gas emissions – Buis says a long-term, comprehensive approach that successfully partners first and next generation fuels is necessary – not a short-sighted, unrealistic and misleading study.

 

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USDA Creates Response To PEDV

USDA has announced a coordinated response to Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Virus and the Swine Delta Coronavirus. The plan includes required reporting of the disease. Pork Checkoff vice president of science and technology Dr. Paul Sundberg is looking for more details on this plan:

Dr. Sundberg 1

USDA will also require tracking movements of pigs, vehicles and other equipment leaving affected premises. Movements of pigs will still be allowed. The impact on pork producers aren’t known at this time

Dr. Sundberg 2

While protocols are in place that deal with the current PEDV issue – Sundberg says the U.S. response must look to the future

Dr. Sundberg 3

Sundberg says the abilities of the veterinary diagnostic labs must also be enhanced – improving communication and preventing the spread of disease. With required reporting – Sundberg says it would be beneficial if USDA could help defray additional producer costs.

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