June acreage estimates are out for North and South Dakota

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North Dakota

Acreage planted to spring wheat in North Dakota for 2011 is estimated at 6.35 million acres, a 1 percentdecrease from last year’s 6.40 million acres. This is based on a survey of North Dakota producers conducted by the USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Service, North Dakota Field Office. Estimates are based on surveysconducted the first two weeks of June; they reflect actual plantings and producer intentions at that time.

Spring wheat to be harvested for grain is estimated at 6.15 million acres, showing a decrease from last year’s estimate of 6.30 million acres. Durum wheat planted acreage is estimated at 1.00 million acres, down 44 percent from 1.80million acres last year. Harvested acreage is expected to total 970,000 acres, down from 1.78 million acres lastyear.

Soybean planted acres, at 4.20 million, are up 2 percent from last year’s record high of 4.10 million acres. Of the acres planted, 94 percent were planted with genetically modified, herbicide resistant seed. Producers expect to harvest 4.15 million acres.

Corn planted for all purposes is estimated at 2.30 million acres, up 12 percent from 2010. Of the total acres, 26 percent were planted with Bt (bacillus thuringiensis) varieties; 32 percent with herbicide resistant varieties; and 39 percent with stacked gene varieties (containing both insect and herbicide resistance). Acreage to be harvested for grain is estimated to be 2.10 million acres.

Barley acreage is down 24 percent from last year to 550,000 acres planted, the lowest planted acreage level on record. Acres to be harvested for grain are estimated at 510,000 acres, down from 670,000 acres last year. Oat planted acres decreased to 210,000, down 70,000 acres from last year’s previous record low. This is the lowest level since records began in 1926. Acres to be harvested for grain are estimated at 75,000, down from105,000 acres last year.

Canola acreage is down 27 percent from last year to 940,000 planted acres. It is estimated that 930,000 acres will be harvested, also down considerably from 2010. Acres planted to oil sunflower decreased to 690,000, down 10,000 acres from last year. An estimated 670,000 acres are expected to be harvested. Non-oil sunflower planted acreage is estimated at 100,000, down from185,000 acres last year. Harvested area is forecast at 95,000 acres.

Flaxseed acreage decreased 190,000 acres from last year to 200,000. It is estimated that 196,000 acres will be harvested. Dry edible bean acres decreased to 420,000, down 47 percent from 800,000 acres planted in 2010. Harvested area is forecast at 405,000 acres.

Sugarbeet planted acres, at 240,000, are up 11 percent from last year and 13,000 acres from March intentions. Harvested area is forecasted at 231,000 acres.

Alfalfa hay acreage that will be cut is estimated at 1.50 million, down 60,000 acres from 2010. Other hay acreage to be cut for hay is forecast at 1.00 million acres, up from 990,000 acres in 2010. Safflower acreage is estimated at 5,000 acres, down 69 percent from last year. It is estimated that 4,500 acres will be harvested.

South Dakota

Corn planted acres in South Dakota for 2011 total5.20 million, up 14 percent (650,000 acres) from last year, according to the South Dakota office of USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service. Acres for grain are forecasted at 4.80 million, up 14 percent (580,000 acres) from last year’s crop. Biotechnology varieties were used on 96 percent of acres planted, up one percentage point compared to a year ago. Nationally, 88 percent of the acreage was seeded with biotechnology varieties in 2011, up from 86 percent last year.

Soybean planted acres in South Dakota for 2011 total 4.30 million, up 2 percent (100,000 acres) from last year. Biotechnology varieties were planted on 98 percent ofthe soybean acres in South Dakota, unchanged from last year. In the United States, 94 percent of the soybean acreage was seeded with biotechnology seed, up from 93 percent last year.

Winter wheat acreage seeded last fall totaled 1.60 million, up 19 percent from last year’s 1.35 million acres. Acres intended for harvest based on June 1 conditions are expected to be 1.55 million, up 250,000 acres from the last year. This is up 19 percent from last year’s harvested acreage. Other spring wheat plantings totaled 1.2 million acres, down 17 percent (250,000acres) from last year. Acres intended for harvest, at 1.17 million acres, are down 17 percent from 2010. Durum wheat plantings totaled 10,000 acres, down 5,000 acres from last year, with all 10,000 acres intended to be harvested for grain in 2011 based on June 1 conditions. Harvested acres are also down 5,000 acres from last year.

All sunflower acres, at 520,000 planted, are up 2 percent from 2010 acreage levels. Oil sunflower acres account for 450,000 acres, up 40,000 acres from last year. Non oil sunflower acres planted, at 70,000, are down 30,000 acres from 2010.

Oats, at 120,000 acres planted, are down 70,000 acres form 2010. Producers intend to harvest 65,000 acres for grain, down 40,000 acres from last year’s harvest. Sorghum plantings, at 180,000 acres, are up 40,000 acres from last year. Proso millet seedings totaled 70,000 acres, down 10,000 acres from last year. Barley planted acreage totaled 20,000 acres, down 43 percent from last year. Flaxseed plantings, at 5,000 acres, are down 7,000 acres from 2010.

All hay harvested acres are expected to total 3.45 million, down 150,000 acres from last year. Alfalfa hay is expected to be harvested from 2.25 million acres, up 100,000acres from last year. Other hay is expected to be harvested from 1.20 million acres, down 250,000 acres from last year.

This report is based on a statewide survey of producers conducted between May 30thand June 15th, and reflects acreage as of June 1. Updated harvested acreage andforecasted yields will be published during the growing season.

Access this complete report at:http://usda.mannlib.cornell.edu/usda/nass/Acre//2011s/2011/Acre-06-30-2011_new_format.pdf

Source: ND & SD NASS, USDA

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