July 6, 2022
Fargo, US 81 F

Planting progress: ND hits halfway point, SD makes gains due to weather

North Dakota

Planting progress for many crops hit the halfway point this week. Barley was 58 percent planted, compared to 100 percent last year and 98 percent for the five-year average. Barley was 31 percent emerged. Spring and Durum wheat were 69 and 25 percent planted, and 39 and 12 percent emerged, respectively. Oats were 72 percent planted and 36 percent emerged. Canola was 51 percent planted, compared to 96 percent at this point last year and 95 percent average. Canola was 19 percent emerged. Corn was 87 percent planted and reached 55 percent emerged, an increase of 25 percentage points from last week.

As of June 5, potato growers had planted 57 percent of the crop, compared to 100 percent at this point last year and 92 percent average. Potatoes were 8 percent emerged. Soybeans were 47 percent planted, behind both last year and the five-year average. Ninety-two percent of the sugarbeet crop had been planted, compared to 100 percent last year and 99 percent average. Sugarbeets were 42 percent emerged. Sunflowers were 26 percent planted this week, compared to 62 percent last year and 75 percent average. Other activities during the week included late fertilizing, tilling fields, and equipment maintenance.

South Dakota

Gains were made in planting progress last week with warmer more seasonable weather. Corn planted reached 93 percent, compared to 95 percent last year and 97 percent on average. Soybeans made considerable progress with 57 percent now planted, still behind last year’s progress of 78 and 81 percent on average. Warmer temperatures are pushing small gain development and row crop emergence. Winter wheat is 4 percent headed, considerably behind the previous year of 43 percent. Sunflower planting is making good progress now 35 percent complete, slightly behind last year’s 41 percent, but equal to the average at 35 percent.

Source: USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service, North & South Dakota offices

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