Report to Congress Highlights Success of Diesel Emissions Reduction Program

Washington, D.C. – More than 50,000 older diesel powered engines were upgraded or replaced between 2008 to 2010 because of Diesel Emission Reduction Act (DERA) funding which resulted in major clean air benefits and fuel savings, according a new report issued today – the “Second Report to Congress: Highlights of the Diesel Emissions Reduction Program” by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. More than 203,000 tons of NOx, 12,500 tons of particulate matter (PM) and 2.3 million tons of CO2 was reduced, while 63 million gallons of fuel was saved due to DERA projects funded through fiscal years 2008 through 2010, according to the April 2013 EPA report.

“DERA has proven consistently that relatively small public investments can be leveraged with significant private sector matching funds that together result in major cost-effective emissions reductions and fuel savings,” Schaeffer said. “According to the report, every $1 in public funds appropriated through the DERA program is leveraged with an additional $3 in non-federal funds including significant private sector investments that result in $7 to $18 in benefits to the public.”

Despite these tremendous accomplishments, future federal funding for the DERA program remains uncertain,” Schaeffer said. “State and local clean air regulators have relied on DERA funding as a key tool to help move communities toward compliance as new and more stringent clean air requirements for Ozone and PM are set to take effect.”

Since its creation in 2005, DERA has been supported by a bipartisan coalition of several hundred environmental and public health organizations, industry representatives, and state and local government associations including the American Lung Association, Natural Resources Defense Council, Environmental Defense Fund, Union of Concerned Scientists and National School Transportation Association. Together these groups continue to work together in educating Congress about these benefits and the importance of continued funding for the program.

Source//Diesel Technology Forum