SDSU Pollinator Workshop Will Have Folks Buzzing in Pierre

SDSU Extension will host a pollinator workshop at the SDSU Extension Regional Center in Pierre  July 15, 2016.
Honey bees are the most well-known pollinators in South Dakota; however, there are many other insects that pollinate crops, wildflowers, and gardens in the state. These pollinators include bees, flies, beetles, and butterflies.iGrow
“Pollinators need flowers, and not every pollinator uses the same kinds of flowers so diversity is extremely important. Creating habitat with something in bloom all summer and containing a diverse assemblage of bloom sizes, shapes and colors will go a long way towards sustaining our native bee populations,” said Amanda Bachmann, SDSU Extension Pesticide Education & Urban Entomology Field Specialist.
Workshop details
The workshop begins at 8:30 a.m. (CST) with registration and ends at 4 p.m. The Extension Center is located at 412 W. Missouri Ave.  Topics to be covered include everything from how to conserve the pollinators who use crop fields and building pollinator habitat to a field visit to the Oahe Downstream Recreation Area to tour the Prairie Butterfly Garden.
To partially cover expenses, this event is $25, lunch is included with the registration fee. This event is sponsored by SDSU Extension and North Central Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education.
Pre-registration is appreciated by July 11, online registration will close at 12:00 pm on July 14.
– See more at: http://igrow.org/news/pollinator-workshop-in-pierre-july-15-2016/#sthash.60RJuWcb.dpuf
Agenda:
8:30 Check-in
9:00 a.m. Pollinators and insecticides: What do we really know? This presentation is led by Adam Varenhorst, Assistant Professor & SDSU Extension Field Crop Entomologist and will discuss the broad-spectrum insecticides that are known to have negative impacts on pest populations as well as beneficial insects present at the time of their application. In recent years, the focus of this topic has been the effect of neonicotinoid seed treatment insecticides on bees. In this session, attendees will review the evidence of the impacts of insecticides on pollinators and discuss the efforts that are underway to minimize pollinator exposure to these chemicals. Participants will get the chance to learn about labeling changes, sensitive site registry, and to reduce the impact of insecticides on pollinators.
11:00 a.m. Finding Diversity in a Green Desert: How to conserve the pollinators that use crop fields: This presentation is led by Matt O’Neal, Associate Professor of Entomology at Iowa State University. Although most of the economically important crops in the Midwest don’t require insect pollination, bees use these crops for nectar and pollen resources. This allows for several species to survive in a landscape dominated by crops such as corn and soybeans. In this session, we will review the beneficial insects found in these crops, with a focus on the pollinator community that uses them. Participants will get a crash-course in insect identification to help them cue-in on some of the most important beneficial insects. Finally, we’ll discuss some approaches to conserving pollinators.
Noon Lunch
1:00 p.m. Building pollinator habitat: considerations for projects large and small: This presentation is led by Amanda Bachmann, SDSU Extension Pesticide Education & Urban Entomology Field Specialist. Pollinators require floral resources (pollen and nectar), nesting sites, and water to be successful. Habitat loss is a factor in pollinator decline, and creating suitable habitat can assist local pollinator populations. In this session we will review strategies for establishing pollinator habitat on both large and small scales. Participants will learn about South Dakota native plants, how to select and establish plant material, site selection, and public outreach.
2:00 p.m. Field Visit to the Oahe Downstream Recreation Area, Prairie Butterfly Garden
If you have questions about this event, contact Amanda Bachmann, SDSU Extension Pesticide Education & Urban Entomology Field Specialist at 605.773.8120 or Adam Varenhorst, Assistant Professor & SDSU Extension Field Crop Entomologist at 605.688.6854.
Presentation Abstracts
Pollinators and insecticides: what do we really know? – Adam Varenhorst
Broad-spectrum insecticides are known to have negative impacts on pest populations as well as beneficial insects present at the time of their application. In recent years, the focus of this topic has been the effect of neonicotinoid seed treatment insecticides on bees. In this session, we will review the evidence of the impacts of insecticides on pollinators and discuss the efforts that are underway to minimize pollinator exposure to these chemicals. Participants will get the chance to learn about labeling changes, sensitive site registry, and to reduce the impact of insecticides on pollinators.
Finding Diversity in a Green Desert: How to conserve the pollinators that use crop fields – Matt O’Neal
Although most of the economically important crops in the Midwest don’t require insect pollination, bees use these crops for nectar and pollen resources. This allows for several species to survive in a landscape dominated by crops such as corn and soybeans. In this session, we will review the beneficial insects found in these crops, with a focus on the pollinator community that uses them. Participants will get a crash-course in insect identification to help them cue-in on some of the most important beneficial insects. Finally, we’ll discuss some approaches to conserving pollinators.
Building pollinator habitat: considerations for projects large and small – Amanda Bachmann
Pollinators require floral resources (pollen and nectar), nesting sites, and water to be successful. Habitat loss is a factor in pollinator decline, and creating suitable habitat can assist local pollinator populations. In this session we will review strategies for establishing pollinator habitat on both large and small scales. Participants will learn about South Dakota native plants, how to select and establish plant material, site selection, and public outreach to promote and support created pollinator habitats. A tour of the Prairie Butterfly Garden at the Oahe Downstream Recreation Area will follow.
iGrow – SDSU